HUSTLE & MUSCLE

Stuart White 20-08-2021 10:00 AM

 

HUSTLE & MUSCLE 

Until as recently as the 1980s a career often meant a job for life within a single company or organisation.  Phrases such as ‘climbing the corporate ladder’, ‘the glass ceiling’, ‘wage slave’ & ‘the rat race’ were thrown  about,  the analogies making clear that a career path was a toxic mix of  a war of attrition, indentured drudgery  and a Sisyphean treadmill.  In all cases you fought, grafted or plodded on till you reached retirement age, at which point you could expect a small leaving party, the promise of a pension and, oddly, a gift of either a clock or watch.  The irony of being rewarded with a timepiece on the very day you could expect to no longer be a workday prisoner was apparently lost on management – the hands of time were destined to follow you to the grave!

Retirement was the goal at the end of the long, corporate journey, time on your hands – verifiable by your gifted  time keeping device - to spend time working in the garden, playing with the grandchildren, enjoying a holiday or two and generally killing time till time killed you.    

For some, retirement could be literally short-lived.  The retirement age, and accompanying pension, was predicated on the old adage of three scores years and ten being the average life expectancy of man.   As the twentieth century progressed and healthcare became more sophisticated, that former mean average was extended but that in itself then brought with it the double-edged sword of dementia.  The longer people lived,  the more widespread dementia became – one more life lottery which some won, some lost and doctors were seemingly unable to predict who would succumb and who would survive.  

However, much research has been carried out on the causes of this crippling and cruel disease and the latest findings indicate that one of its root causes may lie in the  former workplace – what your job entailed and how stimulating or otherwise it was.  It transpires that having an interesting job in your forties could lessen the risk of getting dementia in old age, the mental stimulation possibly staving off the onslaught of the condition by around 18 months.

Academics examined more than 100,000 participants and tracked them for nearly two decades.  They spotted a third fewer cases of dementia among people who had engaging jobs which involved demanding tasks and more control — such as government officers, directors, physicians, dentists and solicitors, compared to adults in 'passive' roles — such as supermarket cashiers, vehicle drivers and machine operators. And those who found their own work interesting also had lower levels of proteins in their blood that have been linked with dementia. 

The study was carried out by researchers from University College London, the University of Helsinki and Johns Hopkins University studying the cognitive stimulation and dementia risk in 107,896 volunteers, who were regularly quizzed about their job.  The volunteers — who had an average age of around 45 — were tracked for between 14 and 40 years.  Jobs were classed as cognitively stimulating if they included demanding tasks and came with high job control. Non-stimulating 'passive' occupations included those with low demands and little decision-making power. 

4.8 cases of dementia per 10,000 person years occurred among those with interesting careers, equating to 0.8 per cent of the group.  In contrast, there were 7.3 cases per 10,000 person years among those with repetitive jobs (1.2 per cent).  Among people with jobs that were in the middle of these two categories, there were 6.8 cases per 10,000 person years (1.12 per cent).

The link between how interesting a person's work was and rates of dementia did not change for different genders or ages.

Lead researcher Professor Mika Kivimaki, from UCL, said: 'Our findings support the hypothesis that mental stimulation in adulthood may postpone the onset of dementia. The levels of dementia at age 80 seen in people who experienced high levels of mental stimulation was observed at age 78.3 in those who had experienced low mental stimulation.  This suggests the average delay in disease onset is about one and half years, but there is probably considerable variation in the effect between people.'

The study, published this week in the British Medical Journal, also looked at protein levels in the blood among another group of volunteers. These proteins are thought to stop the brain forming new connections, increasing the risk of dementia. People with interesting jobs had lower levels of three proteins considered to be tell-tale signs of the condition.  Scientists said it provided 'possible clues' for the underlying biological mechanisms at play.  The researchers noted the study was only observational, meaning it cannot establish cause and that other factors could be at play. However, they insisted it was large and well-designed, so the findings can be applied to different populations.  

To me, there is a further implication in that it might be fair to expect that those in professions such as law, medicine and science might reasonably be expected to have a higher IQ than those in blue collar roles.  This could indicate that mental capacity also plays a part in dementia onset but that’s a personal conclusion and not one reached by the study.  And  for those stuck in dull jobs through force of circumstance, all is not lost since in today’s work culture, the stimulating side-hustle is fast becoming the norm as work becomes not just a means of financial survival but a life-enhancing opportunity , just as in the old adage of ‘Find a job you enjoy and you’ll never work another day in your life’!

Dementia is a global concern but ironically it is most often seen in wealthier countries, where people are likely to live into very old age and is the second biggest killer in the UK behind heart disease, according to the UK Office for National Statistics.   

So here’s a serious suggestion to save you from an early grave and loss of competencies – work hard, play hard and where possible, combine the two!  


 

React

Meet the HRMC Team
Stuart White
Naeem Bhamjee
Sesaleteng Seabe
Shazeen Sheikh
Hassan Stoffel
Copyright © 2021 HRMC Recruitment and Talent   |  Sitemap   |  Disclaimer
HRMC Recruitment uses cookies to remember certain preferences and align jobs interests.